Energy and Environment

tackling marine debris in brunei darussalam (2020)

This study examines how Brunei has been tackling marine debris, what are the gaps and challenges, and proposes solutions toward a more sustainable environment.

The findings show that Brunei has made some progress through initiatives such as “No Plastic Bags Everyday” campaign, excise duty on plastic imports, and clean-up river projects. Suggested improvements include establishing regulation for recycling, introducing incentives to encourage recycling, and enhancing waste management practices.

Alternative Energy Sources for Brunei Darussalam (2011)

Joint study with Ministry of Energy and Powertech Labs Inc.

This study is the first nationwide feasibility assessment of the potential of seven alternative energy sources (bioenergy, wind, solar, hydrogen, nuclear, ocean, and hydroelectricity). The study highlights the potential of alternative energy sources for Brunei to replace fossil fuels in ensuring future energy security and sustainability.

Based on five criteria (financial, environmental, social, technological feasibility, energy security), the most promising projects identified are: (i) waste-to-energy; (ii) onshore wind; (iii) hydroelectric at Benutan reservoir; and (iv) solar photovoltaic. Other low risk projects could include seawater cooling and hydrogen fuel cell. Opportunities for further R&D projects include ocean thermal, wave, osmotic, and seaweed energy. Nuclear, run-of-river, hydrokinetic, and tidal projects were deemed to be infeasible.

The Government has adopted some of these recommendations, outlined in the 2014 Energy White Paper; in particular, solar PV and waste-to-energy development. These recommendations were also detailed in Brunei Darussalam's Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) for COP 21 in Paris, 2015, in which the Government has committed to increasing the share of renewable energy sources in the total power generation mix to at least 10% by 2035.

brunei Energy Efficiency and Conservation study: Roadmap formulation and policy (2011)

Joint study with Ministry of Energy and Mitsubishi Research Institute

This study is the first to provide policy and regulatory advice as well as formulate a national roadmap for energy efficiency and conservation (EEC).

The study finds that the transportation sector accounted for half of total energy consumption in Brunei, followed by the commercial, industrial, and residential sectors with roughly equal shares. With EEC measures, Brunei could reduce its energy consumption by 63% in 2035.

Eight policy recommendations are proposed: (i) electricity tariff reform; (ii) fuel economy regulations; (iii) energy management; (iv) appliance standards; (v) labelling; (vi) building regulations; (vii) financial incentives; and (viii) awareness raising.

The Government has adopted all the recommendations, outlined in the 2014 Energy White Paper. These recommendations were also detailed in Brunei Darussalam's Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) for COP 21 in Paris, 2015, including an explicit national target of energy consumption reduction of 63% by 2035. The study also led to the establishment of a National EEC Committee and the enactment of a regulatory framework.